hide content

click for RSS Feed

divider image
Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too

http://flyfishbonehead.blogspot.com

Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too
Instagram
05/30/14 


Participate the Flyfishbonehead & Tail Fly fishing Magazine brief survey:



Participants at random with receive free gifts like technical visors, truckers caps and Technical Sun Shirts

You can be completely anonymous as well.

Tell us what you like or don't like so we can get better



Continue reading...

Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing for bonefish : What makes a great bonefish fly? Characteristics of top bonefish flies for bonefish on the fly

05/24/14 

bonefishing with flyfishbonehead. Flyfishbonehead knows bonefish. We also make Tail fly fishing magazine and awesome saltwater fly tying videos." width="250" height="115" title="bonefishing with flyfishbonehead. Flyfishbonehead knows bonefish. We make Tail Fly Fishing Magazine, Saltwater Flies (Bonefish flies & Tarpon Flies) & HD saltwater fly tying videos

There are many things that constitute a good bonefish fly, we'll hone in on just a few:

Durability

Movement

Proportion

Productivity


In coming issues of Tail Fly Fishing Magazine, we'll be talking about our favorite bonefish flies and show you how to make them.
We wanted to give you a little bit of a teaser as to where we are going with our bonefish flies and hopefully give you something you can use this season.


1. Durability

Tail Flyfishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make saltwater flies & fly tying videos too.  We know bonefish on the fly
Nothing is worse than a fly that falls apart completely on the first bonefish.
Without totally slamming the flies out there that are made in remote reaches of the world by people who don't even fly fish, they stink!
They are made on cheap hooks with cheap materials and they fall apart usually after 1 or 2 bonefish.
Our bonefish flies are better.
We like to use quality materials with a few extra wraps to make the flies durable.  Lately we've been using some epoxy to add strength to the thread, but also the wing & leg materials.





2. Movement

Tail Flyfishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make saltwater flies & fly tying videos too.  We know bonefish on the fly

Nothing gets a bonefish or any fish to eat like movement.  If the fly is moving with the tidal flow, you are in great shape.
We like to use materials like fox fur, rabbit and various types of sili legs for our bonefish files.

While the furs look amazing in the water, the get heavy and noisy once they are wet and can cause problems in skinny water.

Try tying the same pattern in different materials for different situations so you have options in your box




3. Proportion

Tail Flyfishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make saltwater flies & fly tying videos too.  We know bonefish on the fly

If the fly is not proportioned properly the bonefish will reject it.

This has nothing to do with the quality of the imitation but more to do with the movement of the fly.

If the head/tail are too long, the fly will foul.

Wing too long and the fly could spin.
If the weight of the fly is too far forward or too far back, this could make the fly look un-natural to a bonefish causing rejection of the fly.

Take you time to get it right and test your new patterns in the water like we do. 

4. Productivity

Tail Flyfishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make saltwater flies & fly tying videos too.  We know bonefish on the fly
Depending on where you are fly fishing for bonefish will dictate the productivity of your pattern.
Local food in the waters, time of year and weather conditions will all play an important part of fly selection.

You wouldn't throw a small dark fly to a big bonefish on a cloudy day in murky water...they'll never see it.
You selection is important and will be one of the topics in our upcoming Tail Fly Fishing Magazine feature.

Please be sure to check back and remember that Tail Fly Fishing Magazine is free online at Flyfishbonehead.

Come visit and read all of the back issues, each issue has a free fly tying video , most are for popular bonefish flies like Veverka's Mantis Shrimp, Simram, EP Spawning Shrimp and more.

We know bonefish on the fly.

Check out all of the fly tying videos in our giant HD library of fly tying videos



Tail Flyfishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make saltwater flies & fly tying videos too.  We know bonefish on the fly


Continue reading...

05/12/14 

Friends of Flyfishbonehead:
Saltfly Lifestyles Offering

Striped Marlin highway to Kingfish Lodge

October 31 last year, ending the winter with a celebration for what's to come, saw Kingfish Lodge host their official grand opening of the 2013 high season - I decided to go up there last summer to see what the northern harbors have to offer from a land based anglers perspective.  I was fully absorbed by their stunning views and remarkable professional service, Jeremy and his team offer.   After our initial meeting at the wharf, we cruised through the fiord like harbor totally insignificant in size comparison and in awe of the presence of natures best works of art.   I must mention that returning here is at the top of my priorities list every year from now on-wards.
Premier Whangaroa Harbour Entrance Destination Kingfish Lodge - Saltfly Lifestyles
View from Whangaroa Harbour Entrance Destination
Kingfish Lodge

Therefor now packages, with luxury yet affordable accommodation has been put together.  Boat or helicopter access only for visiting anglers.  Nothing but the best is now available at only NZ$5500+GST for a three night, four day adventure in the far northern parts of New Zealand.  At about as far as you can possibly go north as you need to, this destination will knock your socks off.  The shear remoteness was most definitely what made me want to go back there, not to mention it is the deepest harbor in New Zealand.  Boasting all manners of sports fish right in close with some of the most desirable methods available today - from swallow water sand flats to deep reefs - rock hopping to kayak fly angling and then another option of Big Game.
Farnorth - Saltfly Lifestyles - fly fishing in New Zealand
This shot is a compilation of some of my favorite moments as a amateur photo-graphical artist / blogger - combining salt water fly angling with a creative twist - using only and Iphone4S and social media for expressing my works to a unique following of mad keen adventurers....
The lodge is located in Northland - the third inlet down from Cape Reinga just below Doubtless Bay - This area is well known and a mecca for sports anglers from around the globe - Offering world class Stripe Marlin fishing together with Five star accommodation in the newly refurbished Kingfish Lodge. The name subsequently come from the highly regarded sports fish, the King fish - Seriola Lalandi - These species are the mainstay and also the natural prey for bigger palages in our sub tropical latitudes.
Many other species are readily available to us and surprisingly not far out from our base. Along with a few seriously fruitful sand flats, rock ledges and channels up for grabs, a four day adventure will only cost you NZ$6325.
Last seasons visiting sports fishing anglers attempted a new world record for the Stripe Marlin on a 10 kg tippet - and succeeded in doing so by capturing an astounding 109,3 kg Stripe Marlin with renown salt water fly guide Dean Butler. To find out more about the lodge - please read their blog or contact themhere.
Special rates apply to my existing client base and for referrals which leads to confirmations - discounts will be granted to our VIP's.
Farnorth - Saltfly Lifestyles - Fly Fishing in New Zealand
The only odd on shot in this group is the top left Unicorn fish - available only in tropical environments and not in NZ - The rest are all shots from the top of the North Island.

This winter will also host a month long expedition into the unknown South Pacific - Check out the Saltfly Lifestyle Blog for more details.

Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - bonefish on the fly.

JP Samuelson (Sltfly Lifestyles) is a contributor to Tail Fly Fishing Magazine and Flyfishbonehead



Continue reading...

05/02/14 


Tail Fly Fishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead 
is the only fly fishing magazine that is devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.

We are pleased to announce the release of 
Issue 11 - May/June 2014

Tail Fly Magazine by Flyfishbonehead is the only fly fishing magazine devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.  We know bonefish on the fly


Check out all the great features:


What do bonefish eat?
by Dr Aaron Adams of the Bonefish & Tarpon Trust

Tail Fly Magazine by Flyfishbonehead is the only fly fishing magazine devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.  We know bonefish on the fly



We even included a bonefish fly tying video:
Learn to tie the Yucatan Charlie Fly

Tail Fly Magazine by Flyfishbonehead is the only fly fishing magazine devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.  We know bonefish on the fly


Myths & Misconceptions:
Debunk some classic fly fishing myths that have 
been propagated though the years

Tail Fly Magazine by Flyfishbonehead is the only fly fishing magazine devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.  We know bonefish on the fly


Our interview with Lance Marshall Boen
Artist, fly fisherman and extremely tall

Tail Fly Magazine by Flyfishbonehead is the only fly fishing magazine devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.  We know bonefish on the fly



Can't catch fish?
An early day and a cerveza is one option, 
but how about plan B

Tail Fly Magazine by Flyfishbonehead is the only fly fishing magazine devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.  We know bonefish on the fly


Go to a fish spa.
They really do exist but its not what you think

Tail Fly Magazine by Flyfishbonehead is the only fly fishing magazine devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.  We know bonefish on the fly


Lose you heart (and fly) in Monterey
Tail Travel feature on Monterey, California

Tail Fly Magazine by Flyfishbonehead is the only fly fishing magazine devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.  We know bonefish on the fly


Did we mention the Bonefish Prey article?
Yes, we did mention what bonefish eat.

Tail Fly Magazine by Flyfishbonehead is the only fly fishing magazine devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.  We know bonefish on the fly


See the entire Magazine online at Flyfishbonehead 

Here's the Table of Contents for Tail Fly Fishing Magazine Issue 11

Tail Fly Magazine by Flyfishbonehead is the only fly fishing magazine devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.  We know bonefish on the fly



Continue reading...

04/20/14 

Tail Fly Fishing Magazine is the free magazine of Flyfishbonehead.  It is the only fly fishing magazine completely devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.  Each issue has a free saltwater fly tying video.

Tail Fly Fishing Magazine is the free magazine of Flyfishbonehead.  It is the only fly fishing magazine completely devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.  Each issue has a free saltwater fly tying video.

Tail Fly Fishing Magazine has taken off!
  We can only thank you....our readers, contributors and general supporters.
  Flyfishbonehead & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine are grateful for the many contributions from all over the world, and thank specific contributors:

Paul Boscia in Connecticut
Alex Lovett-Woodsum in Miami (Bonefish & Tarpon Trust)
Matt Grove in Pennsylvania
JP Samuelson in New Zealand (Saltfly Lifestyles)
Koby Ferguson in the Indian Ocean
Zac Grossman in West Palm Beach
Aaron Adams in the Florida Keys (Bonefish & Tarpon Trust)
Mode Edom in the Maldives
Peter Schwartz in Ohio

We are looking forward to more contributors from more destinations worldwide.
Our focus has been been Bonefish, Tarpon & Marlin.
 We have more great stuff coming on Redfish, Permit, Mahi-Mahi and Peacock Bass.
We are also adding Steelhead and Salmon Flies to the HD Fly Tying Videos.

Would you like to contribute?


If you are a guide or just an avid fisher and you have something to contribute, please contact us.

Flyfishbonehead World Map of Fly Fishing & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine - What can I contribute

We have more bonefish flies coming this spring.
There are over 200 videos currently.  We hope to bring this number to 300 by November of 2014.
We have over 30 new bonefish fly tying videos in the works.
There are 20 new tarpon fly tying videos scheduled for upload this summer.
No wonder we are the #1 website for fly fishing in saltwater.

If you have a fly that you want us to add, send us your fly and a description on how it came to be and how to best use it.  We'll add it to the library of fly tying videos and give you credit for it.

Tail Fly Fishing Magazine is the free magazine of Flyfishbonehead.  It is the only fly fishing magazine completely devoted to fly fishing in saltwater.  Each issue has a free saltwater fly tying video.
HUNT FOR FISH, NOT INFORMATION

Continue reading...

04/04/14 

Tail Fly Fishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  Saltwater fly fishing magazine wit a focus on art, fly fishing photography, fly fishing destination travel, saltwater flies & salt water fly tying videos.

Tail Fly Fishing Magazine subscribers want to see your best stuff. Send us articles and photos and we'll do our best to make you famous(ish).


Your submissions should reflect the fact that Tail focuses exclusively on fly fishing in saltwater. We aim to supply our readers with accurate, useful, and entertaining stories about saltwater fish, angling techniques, flies and fly-tying, and angling destination pieces



Tail Fly Fishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  Saltwater fly fishing magazine wit a focus on art, fly fishing photography, fly fishing destination travel, saltwater flies & salt water fly tying videos.




We will also consider articles that are not strictly how-to/where-to pieces, so long as there's some connection to saltwater fly-fishing.

As a general rule, articles should be in the neighborhood of 1,000 to 2,000 words, but there are no hard-and-fast rules as to the length of articles that we'll accept.

Article submissions should include relevant photographs; all photos must be high quality digital shots. If you have a stellar story but do not have appropriate photos to include, we'll try to work with you to provide them.

All article submissions should be in Word, Pages or PDF format and should be sent to info@flyfishbonehead.com. Photographs should be attached to your email or shared via dropbox (flyboss@flyfishbonehead.com)

Tail Fly Fishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  Saltwater fly fishing magazine wit a focus on art, fly fishing photography, fly fishing destination travel, saltwater flies & salt water fly tying videos.


We reserve the right to edit all submissions, and to use or not use your photographs, at our discretion.

Payment for stories is on a case-by-case basis. Payment, if any, is not based on word-count but rather on the quality of the article and accompanying photos. If we do pay you for an article or photos, you sign over full rights to those items: they become our exclusive property, and cannot be reused by you or anyone else without our express written consent.

If you're a generous soul and send us materials gratis, the materials remain yours, and you're free to use them as you wish. If you do choose to republish such materials, we would be grateful that you state that they first appeared in Tail Fly Fishing Magazine.

Tail Fly Fishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  Saltwater fly fishing magazine wit a focus on art, fly fishing photography, fly fishing destination travel, saltwater flies & salt water fly tying videos.



Continue reading...

03/23/14 

Bonefishing ?

We love bonefishing.  

That's why Flyfishbonehead 

Bonefishing with the best saltwater fly fishing magazine!  Flyfishbonehead makes Saltwater flies, fly tying videos and Tail FLy Fishing Magazine

went to Oahu to fish for the Giant Bonefish of Hawaii.
Read it in 
Tail Fly Fishing Magazine - Issue 10

Bonefishing with the best saltwater fly fishing magazine!  Flyfishbonehead makes Saltwater flies, fly tying videos and Tail FLy Fishing Magazine


Bonefishing with the best saltwater fly fishing magazine!  Flyfishbonehead makes Saltwater flies, fly tying videos and Tail FLy Fishing Magazine


Conversation to start the morning: 
Me: This water is pretty dark
My guide: Yep.
Me: I really can't see much.
Guide: Don't worry, you'll see them.
Me: I can't even see my feet, what do you think I'll see up ahead? 
Guide: Giant green torpedoes.
Me: oh?!

Just at that moment a huge bonefish weighing probably 9-10 pounds started tailing in the dark waters at exactly 12 o'clock.
We were wading on a flat that was really only accessible at low tide. We hit the water just before morning light on an incoming tide which gave us about 2-3 hours to fish.
It was very skinny but visibility was terrible as there was just no light.
When fly fishing in Hawai'i for bonefish, presentation is everything. The goal is to survive the plop. If the fish doesn't spook when the fly hits the water, that fish is hooked 99% of the time. We used 6 weight rods with 12-foot leaders. The flies were tied on sizes 4, 6 & 8 hooks. A sidearm cast, parallel to the water, was necessary to ensure a soft presentation and landing - otherwise you didn't stand a chance at hooking a fish.
But back to the bonefish charging right at us - I threw at him.
My throw was on target but a little short so the guide encouraged me to pick it up and throw again.
Just as I began my second attempt, the guide shouts "we're going to lose him" and casts to my fish.
He just snaked my bonefish.
While I'm encouraged by an enthusiastic guide who still loves to fish, this was a bit too much. He just snaked a potentially double digit bonefish.
Fortunately, he began apologizing before it completed the initial run and it was pretty genuine as he tried to hand me the rod. The guy just loves to fish and his enthusiasm got the best of him.


Continue reading...

03/09/14 

 Tail Flyfishing Magazine is flyfishing in saltwater.  The best fly fishing magazine

Tail Fly Fishing Magazine

Issue 10 
March 2014

by Flyfishbonehead
Flyfishbonehead  - we know bonefish & tarpon on the fly.  We also make saltwater flies, saltwater fly tying videos & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine

Flyfishbonehead  - we know bonefish &  tarpon on the fly.  We also make saltwater flies, saltwater fly tying videos & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine

Flyfishbonehead  - we know bonefish &  tarpon on the fly.  We also make saltwater flies, saltwater fly tying videos & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine

What can we say, giant bonefish, bonefish fly tying, bonefishing in the Bahamas, Fishing for bonefish in the Indian Ocean.....Issue 10 of Tail Fly fishing is all about bonefish. There's also surf fishing in New Zealand for Kahawai.


Flyfishbonehead  - we know bonefish &  tarpon on the fly.  We also make saltwater flies, saltwater fly tying videos & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine

Halfway around the world a young man catches his first bonefish in the Indian Ocean
We stalked and caught the Giant bonefish of Hawaii in Moloka'i & Oahu

Flyfishbonehead  - we know bonefish &  tarpon on the fly.  We also make saltwater flies, saltwater fly tying videos & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine


Have you heard of Chewbacca? How about Tim Borski? Have you heard of Chewborski?

Flyfishbonehead  - we know bonefish &  tarpon on the fly.  We also make saltwater flies, saltwater fly tying videos & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine
Tom Karrow introduces Ghost Stories - Origins of fly fishing for bonefish in the Bahamas. Part of an ongoing series in Tail Fly Fishing Magazine.

Our fly tying video is JOEY'S LITTLE BONER. This is flyboss' first super productive pattern for bonefish. It's a small bonefish fly with lots of color and movement. Everyone loves fishing this fly almost as much as saying the name.
Flyfishbonehead  - we know bonefish &  tarpon on the fly.  We also make saltwater flies, saltwater fly tying videos & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine



How about a great SHRIMP & GRITS recipe
Flyfishbonehead  - we know bonefish &  tarpon on the fly.  We also make saltwater flies, saltwater fly tying videos & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine




Flyfishbonehead  - we know bonefish &  tarpon on the fly.  We also make saltwater flies, saltwater fly tying videos & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine


Flyfishbonehead  - we know bonefish &  tarpon on the fly.  We also make saltwater flies, saltwater fly tying videos & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine


Continue reading...

02/01/14 

flyfishbonehead we know bonefishing.  We also also make Tail Fly Fishing Magazine, salt water flies & saltwater fly tying videos

Flyfishbonehead 

we make 

Tail Fly Fishing Magazine

flyfishbonehead we know bonefishing.  We also also make Tail Fly Fishing Magazine, salt water flies & saltwater fly tying videos

Sign up as an Enthusiast member 

from February 10 - 17 

& get a tech visor FREE*

Yes, you get a tech visor worth $16.99 by becoming a Flyfishbonehead enthusiast for only $15...wait, did we really do that?  
Yes we did.  Enjoy the fly tying videos & enjoy the visor.
(*Visor is free but $4.00 shipping/handling fee applies in the US)
(There is a $7.00 shipping /handling fee for outside of the US)

Flyfishbonehead tech visor is awesome.  check out the fly tying videos, technical gear and saltwater flies at flyfishbonehead.  We also make tail fly fishing magazine too


flyfishbonehead we know bonefishing.  We also also make Tail Fly Fishing Magazine, salt water flies & saltwater fly tying videosFlyfishbonehead makes tech gear that is perfect for bonefishing!


Continue reading...

01/17/14 

tail fly fishing magazine & fly fishbonehead fly fish for bonefish in the carribean

Flyfishbonehead & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine are 

Bonefish Hunting in the Turks and Caicos 

Sharing an article by Jack Otter

The Turks and Caicos are not a classic bonefish destination, like the Bahamas, Christmas Island or Los Roques. But I know from my previous visit that the bonefish are here, hiding in the roots of the mangroves and cruising for shrimp in the sandy flats.  What is also here is a boutique resort, Parrot Cay, that offers a lot more than fishing.

Parrot Cay has two respectable restaurants, wide open sandy beaches, and a reputation as a celebrity getaway; many guests rent houses or compounds belonging to the likes of Donna Karan, Christie Brinkley, Bruce Willis, and Keith Richards. CNN correspondent John King arrived shortly before we left.

Our April visit was no accident. December and January are the classic months for Caribbean travel; high-end resorts look for ways to fill rooms in the tapering days of late April. Naturally, off-season means lower prices. Reduced rates plus various promotional deals add up: Four nights in Parrot Cay's new two-bedroom beach houses, which come with a private pool and 24/7 butler service, will run you $21,000 in high season, but $12,000 in April and May. Prices fall again in June. The same math applies for more modest rooms, where 4 nights in April run $1,950, down from $3,000 in high season.
Not only is the bill lower, the solitude is exquisite. One afternoon I looked down the beach and counted the people: Two. It's a private island with only 72 rooms and residences, so there are no crowds to wander down from the next resort. We never waited for a table at dinner or a sailboat from the water-sports shack. A lounge chair by the huge infinity pool? They were always available, fresh towel folded on top. I saw a guy at breakfast with a T-shirt that read, "Silence is the new luxury." An odd thing to print on clothing, I thought, but an outstanding slogan. Only on my last day did I realize it was a Parrot Cay T-shirt.
Flyfishbonehead reprint of Jack OtterMy wife, Diane, stretched alone in a stunning yoga studio; a huge picture window giving her a blue and green vista of the waters. I floated away from a deep tissue massage at the COMO Shambhala spa, but my real Zen came with the single-minded focus of stalking bonefish, a reprieve from the multi-tasking of work and fatherhood.

The shy-faced bonefish.
My fishing guide was Captain Jimmylee Gray, arranged by guest services for $550 for a half-day of fishing.  At 8 a.m., I stepped into his skiff with my Orvis rod. There is apparently no speed limit in the mangroves of the Turks and Caicos islands. Captain Gray wasn't steering so much as skidding his two-seater boat through the narrow channels, branches passing within inches of my head. As the outboard revved past 4,000 rpm, it felt like we were filming a chase scene in a James Bond flick.
We emerged from the narrow channels to wide shallow sand flats and he cut the motor. Except for the wind, luxurious silence. Most fishing involves dark water, bait and prayer. Fly fishing for bonefish is more like hunting: You scan the two-foot deep water for the fish, known as grey ghosts, as they follow the tide up into the shallows in search of crustaceans. The goal is to drop the fly close enough that they will see it, but far enough that it doesn't spook them when it hits the water.
I tied on my secret weapon: the Peterson Spawning Shrimp, proud of the fact that mine was actually tied by Eric Peterson, a friend of my brother's.
Most fly fishing guides use fighter pilot terminology to point out fish: The bow of the boat is 12 o'clock, so a fish directly off the starboard beam would be at 3 o'clock.  Capt. Gray is simply pointing. "Fish," he says. "Three of them. Coming this way." From above they look like miniature grey submarines. My first cast landed far in front of the lead sub. He kept coming, ignoring the fly. The next cast landed right in the middle of the group, causing them to scatter. My guide's silence signified rebuke, not luxury.
Soon another group of fish, and another, better, cast. But they too ignored my shrimp. "Change the fly," Capt. Gray instructed. I showed him my box, and he complemented the collection. (Thanks, brother.) He chose a lighter shrimp pattern, "the prosecutor," that better matched the sandy bottom.
Again, I cast in front of the lead fish. Again, he swam past, uninterested. Then, suddenly, a U-turn and he was heading toward it. "Strip!" roared Capt. Gray, instructing me to pull in the line, to mimic a panicking prawn. "Strip faster!" Then, confusion, as the fish wondered why the prosecutor didn't taste like shrimp, and the fisherman wondered if he really has it hooked.
The fish shot away across the flat so fast it sent up spray and left a v-shaped wake behind. There was no use trying to slow it down; it would just break the line. (The first time I hooked a bonefish, the reel spun so hard it cut my knuckles, so I knew to keep my hands out of the way.) Eventually the fish slowed, I started to reel in, and he took off again. But I eventually landed him. Capt. Gray left him in the water while removing the hook, reducing the trauma. Out of the water they are beautiful, silver and green, with a shy face. About six pounds, decent size. After the requisite photo, the fish swam away.
Parrot Cay's solitude extended to my fishing trip. I did not see a single boat. 
From Cape Cod to Key West, I've never experienced such a thing. 
Then Capt. Gray surprised me again. "I'm not really watching the clock, man," he said. "Do you need to meet your wife for lunch?"
"She'll understand; I'm fishing," I responded, pleased that my half-day trip was extending into the afternoon.

"Good. Cast into that channel, a bunch of them coming right toward us."

Reprinted from Penta Daily

Continue reading...

01/14/14 

I Hooked a Bonefish on my First Cast....

Bonefishing in Biscayne Bay - Addiction & Failure

reprinted from Tail Fly Fishing Magazine - September 2012


Addiction, part one


"On my first cast to a bonefish on Biscayne Bay, Miami in August of 2008 I hooked up my first bonefish. " 

We rolled out of Black point Marina, into a skinny water eel grass flat which was as smooth as a bowl of melted glass.  The sun was just starting to surface in its awesome orange glow, illuminating the horizon.  We saw spiders the size of birds high up in the mangroves in the early morning light.  In fact, there may have been a bird caught in one of the webs.  What am I doing here?  We traveled by canoe through a very small creek.  It was shallow, muddy, smelled like sulfur and there were lots of bugs.  Again, what was I thinking this morning?  It fed into a small cove named Black Point about 10 miles south of Miami Beach.  It did get better.  As I was admiring the sunrise and right as we entered the creek mouth onto the flats, the guide whispers; "see them?  There they are!"  
I was nervous, very nervous.  
I has just started fly fishing after being a bait chunker since age 4, frankly, my fly casting wasn't that good.  He said; "I'll get you closer, get ready to cast."  My heart was racing at about 120 beats per minute, I felt my palms getting sweaty and the grip on my cork handle start to loosen.  The cork was indented from the raw pressure of my grip but it just didn't seem tight enough so I just kept squeezing.  I felt as if my body was getting heavier and heavier and there was little I could do about it.
"12 o'clock, about 45 feet, see them?"  I did, there were 6 or 7 big bonefish right in front of me, tailing, I'd never seen them tail at such short range.  This was my chance to catch my first bone on a fly, I was so excited, I could taste success.
The first cast was completely flubbed of course, throwing the fly about 20 feet short and about 30 feet to the left of the school.  I picked up my line using the water haul technique, which at that moment, I really didn't know existed.  Somehow, I don't know if it was the adrenaline or just plain luck but I fired a 40 foot laser into the center of this small school of tailing bones.  I saw a flash of silver and heard my guide scream, he ate it, set it ....set it!  So I pulled back on the line and set the 7 pound bonefish on the hook.  My rod bent like I had never seen it bend before.  Probably because I never had a fish of that brawn on it before.  With reel screaming, the mighty bone pulled off about 150 feet of line in a blazing initial run lasting only seconds.  My guide bellows, "you are the luckiest guy in the world, no one catches a bonefish on their first cast."  It was actually my second to be historical.  While completing his statement, as quick as it was hooked, it was gone.  My knot gave way, leaving a pigtailed leader shooting back at the canoe.  
I quickly retrieved my line and the guide grabbed it for a closer look.  "You need to check you knots, man....you just lost a huge fish because of a knot."
I had a pit in my stomach and for the first time since I was 4 years old, I didn't want to fish anymore.  That was probably good because there weren't anymore fish that morning.  I felt like a complete failure but there was a part of me that thought, well if you did it once, you can do it again.  This optimism is what kept me coming back.
I fished unsuccessfully for several months that followed, sometimes with a guide, sometimes without. 
Tail Fly Fishing Magazine - Bonefishing in Biscayne Bay with Flyfishbonehead

Finally near Matheson Hammock in Miami it happened again.
It was the same scenario, but I had been fishing without a guide for about a week.  I launched my kayak from the public beach on a pebble shore which was not too far from a channel.  
It was overcast and warm for the time of year, the tides were very dramatic and there was rain was on the horizon.  Only lightning would make me leave the flats, especially after waking up at 4:30 am to get on the water by sunrise.  Wouldn't you know it there was lightning on the distant horizon amid the rain.  I knew I didn't have much time.
I had my favorite 8 weight weight ready, handle at my feet with the tip off the bow, this time I tied my own leader and checked my knots twice.  I even tied my own fly, Peterson's spawning shrimp, my goto bonefish fly at that time.  While poling my kayak over a deep boat channel, I saw something in the distance.  There they were, 6 or 7 bonefish tailing in about a foot of water on an eel grass flat.  They were fat and happy.  It looked like the same school as before but the chance of that was seriously non existent.
Here we go again.
I pole with a rope looped around my wrist.  The rope is tied to the anchor line which allows me to quickly loop the rope around my push pole and gently drop it behind the kayak to drag behind my vessel, well out of the way.  I pushed hard just one more time to get into a better position.  I looped my rope, dropped the pole, picked up the fly rod and attempted to visualize my attack.
This time I was ready.  Calmer, more experienced, and a much better caster, but still no bones to date so the nervousness persisted to a significant degree.  In this moment, you just accept the tachycardia and sweaty palms knowing that the hunt is on.
I began my cast, very sloppy and too fast of a backcast which seems to be the norm while casting when fish that are actually present.  I threw a 35 foot lob which hit the water like a rock, just to the right of the tailing fish.  Fortunately, they were just starting to move right.  It was more luck than skill honestly.
There was very little light, almost no light.  In fact, I'm quite surprised I saw them in the first place.  I couldn't see what was going on but before I could react, one took the fly and there was a fish on.
Again the rod had a ferocious bend and a crazy bounce to it as I held it over my head.  But this one wasn't as big as the previous bonefish hooked.  The fish took off into the boat channel that I had just crossed and before I knew it,  it was well into the "holy crap" part of my backing.  Over 250 feet of backing gone and at no point did I have any control of the fish.  Suddenly, it stopped.  My heart sunk as I thought the fish was lost.  In frustration, I began to reel as fast as my hand could move and watched the kayak start to drift toward the direction of the fishes run.  It was still on!  In minutes I had retrieved my backing and was back to fly line but at that point the resting fish recovered.  Another screaming run begins which put me back into "holy crap" territory but this time I noticed that the lightning, which was off in the horizon, is much closer and now the rain began to fall. 
Here I am on a kayak in Biscayne Bay, in a lightning storm fighting a bonefish that just won't make it easy.  I debated whether I should break it off and head for shore before the storm got too bad but my ego got the best of me and refused to let it go.  I was tired of failure and frustration and I was going for broke.  Succeed or die trying was the motto that day, which in retrospect was an incredibly stupid decision.
I started to pressure the fish hard, really hard.  At any moment I was expecting him to break off and become just another "almost" story.  To my amazement, he began to wilt.  He lost his mojo and any desire to fight.  Again my heart raced, I could taste it, success was almost mine.
Within five minutes, my leader was to the tip and I had a bonefish, my first bonefish to the side of the kayak, he had surrendered.  Soaking wet from the rain, not remotely concerned about  the lightning I pulled him out of the water, so excited that I dropped my rod into the water but it didn't matter.
There it was, mirrored silver scales, blackish green stripes, unrealistic pink lips and my Peterson's spawning shrimp stuck in its top lip.  It was slippery, slimy & stinky, but it was a bonefish, caught on a fly, finally in my hands.  
It was glorious!  The most beautiful fish I had ever seen at that moment.  I actually just stared at it for sometime taking in the details before I realized it was raining hard, there was lightning nearby and this poor bonefish couldn't breath.
I lunged for the camera for a quick photo of my trophy but to my dismay, the battery was dead and to add more insult I dropped the fish into the water and stepped on the fly. One rookie mistake after another, they seem to never end...I can be such a bonehead.
But after months of frustration, repeated failure and countless hours of research and investigation I had just caught my first bonefish on a fly.
bonefishing - bonefish on the fly - bonefish flies  by flyfishbonehead and Tail Fly Fishing Magazine


But after finally catching this fish, I realized that this was more than just an obsession.  Not only that, but perseverance in the face of constant failure & determination to succeed had turned my obsession to an addiction. A healthy one of course but I still had  so many questions.
Why was it so hard to find good information about fly fishing in salt water?  
Why did it take me 6+ months to land a bonefish when I've been fishing my whole life?  Are there other places to fish? What other species are as challenging?
Where can I get really solid advice and real data?  
I didn't know the answers either, but then it hit me.....I'm a bonehead, I'm a a fly fish bonehead!  The lightbulb in my head just lit. (Continued in Addiction part 2)

Read what happens in the next issue of Tail Fly Fishing Magazine.  Read it for free!!!
Share your first bonefish catch on a fly on our blog.

Continue reading...

01/05/14 

flyfishbonehead makes tail fly fishing magazine, saltwater flies & saltwater fly tying videos 

flyfishbonehead makes tail fly fishing magazine, saltwater flies & saltwater fly tying videos

 

Update January 5, 2014

Whats new.....well....lots!

The new issue of Tail Fly Fishing Magazine is a huge hit.
(see below)

Flyfishbonehead announces release of technical gear releasing images of a new tech visor and shirt.  

Affordable gear for effective fly fishing which looks good and functions incredibly well.

Flyfishbonehead technical gear - Fly Fishing Tech Visor

The CUDA BOWL is TONS of FUN.  


flyfishbonehead link to the cuda bowl in key west

There's no better reason to visit Key West in January than hard hitting Barracuda. 


Issue 9 is a huge hit with a new record number of readers.  

We topped 4000 readers so far in January!!!  
All of us at Tail Fly Fishing Magazine are so grateful for your support.

Check out some of the features:

Our newest fly tying video for the bonefish fly called the Ultra Modern Shrimp.
You can watch the fly tying video for free in the magazine


Do you know Chris Bladen?
He is a phenomenal artist and angler....
he's also a really cool guy.  
Check out the interview



Which fish is the fastest fish in ocean?
Find out in Tail Fly FIshing Magazine issue 9

from you fishing buddies at


flyfishbonehead makes tail fly fishing magazine, saltwater flies & saltwater fly tying videos
&
flyfishbonehead makes tail fly fishing magazine, saltwater flies & saltwater fly tying videos



Continue reading...

01/01/14 

The January Issue of TAIL Fly Fishing Magazine is awesome!

Tail Fly fishing magazine is the free digital fly fishing magazine by flyfishbonehead - This is Issue 9



Read the great feature articles for the January 2014 edition.


Fastest Fishing in the Ocean:



flyfishbonehead & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine - Fastest Fish in the Ocean - we fly fish in saltwater

We give you our top ten list of the fastest fish in the ocean.  Some people disagree but that is expected.  Tell us what you think.


Interview with an incredible metalsmith & angler Chris Bladen:

Meet Chris Bladen in Tail Fly fishing magazine issue 9 - the free digital fly fishing magazine by flyfishbonehead

From South Africa, Chris Bladen has traveler and fished the world.  He is a professional artist creating amazing sometimes lifesize bronze sculptures of aquatic life capturing their movement and beauty.


Saltwater Fly Tying Video: the Ultra Modern Shrimp 

Free Fly Tying Video in Tail Fly fishing magazine issue 9 - the free digital fly fishing magazine by flyfishbonehead

Ultra Modern Shrimp by Flyfishbonehead was created as an update to legendary fly tyer & innovator Bob Popovic's ultra shrimp.  We never thought it would work so well!  See the entire fly tying video for free inside this issue of Tail fly fishing magazine.


Tarpon on a Kayak?  Yep.


Tapon on a kayak in Tail Fly fishing magazine issue 9 - the free digital fly fishing magazine by flyfishbonehead

Alex Lovett-Woodsum of the Bonefish & Tarpon Trust takes us on a wild ride fishing for tarpon from kayaks and stand up paddle-boards (SUPs).  See the video and read about the mayhem.
There's also a chance to win a free TFO fly rod from the Bonefish & Tarpon Trust inside.



Just how fast is a Bonefish?    

how fast is a bonefish - Tail Fly fishing magazine issue 9 - the free digital fly fishing magazine by flyfishbonehead

Tail Fly fishing magazine issue 9 - the free digital fly fishing magazine by flyfishbonehead

It is created by fly anglers for fly anglers.  
We hope that the anglers of the world enjoy the content and all of the free fly tying videos.  
Fly fishing is a specialized sport with a very small number of active participants.  
We need to protect our traditions and environments while enriching our sport for future generations to share and enjoy.

Please visit Flyfishbonehead and participate!
Tail Fly fishing magazine is the free digital fly fishing magazine by flyfishbonehead

Continue reading...

Flyfishbonehead & Tail Magazine - Things to be Thankful for in 2013

11/28/13 

Tail Flyfishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too

Some things to be thankful for in 2013 from your friends at

Tail Flyfishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too      &Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too

(in no particular order of importance)


1. That we were healthy enough to fish another year.
2. The Billfish act was passed into law
3. Our great friends & family to share the memories with
4. Tarpon are finally catch and release in Florida
5. The MidAtlantic region of the United States did not experience another super storm.
6. Snook in southeastern Florida have made a strong return. 
7. There was only one typhoon this year
8. Affordable airfare!!
9. Flyfishbonehead & all of  the saltwater fly tying videos
10. Tail Fly Fishing Magazine
Tail Flyfishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too



The blog previewing the new issue (Tail Fly Fishing Magazine - issue 9) will be uploaded after the thanksgiving holiday.  Please enjoy time with family or friends.  
Don't take for granted the time you have, every minute counts.



Tail Fly Fishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  
Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too
Tail Flyfishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead.  Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too

Continue reading...

Planning a fly fishing trip? Use the Flyfishbonehead World Map of Fly Fishing to help plan. All the information you need including gear, flies, fishing calendars and more.

11/24/13 

the WORLD MAP of FLY FISHING 
by
Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too

We have been receiving many emails about how to use the map recently.  Based on these emails, it was clear that there is some confusion about the various features of the map.  Flyboss & the rest of the crew at Flyfishbonehead thought that a blog tutorial was necessary.


Select destination & using the zoom feature
Go to Flyfishbonehead, select the world map of fly fishing and select your destination.


Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too


The Magnifying glasses on the map allow the user to zoom into regions like central america, south american, the south Pacific or the Caribbean.

Click on the magnifying glass to enlarge or zoom in to an area....

Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too


  Flyfishbonehead World Map of Fly Fishing - Zoom View
From Either the zoom view or the regular view, you can click on the destination of your choice....

Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too


The link leads to the Destination Information tab which is the first tab of all destinations on the Flyfishbonehead World Map of Fly Fishing.
This tab provides basic destination information for a given locale and is sometimes basic & sometimes very detailed.


Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too


By clicking on the tabs, the information for that specific destination will be shown.
Each tab contains specific information:
1. Destination Information
2. Species available and Tactics used
3. What gear to bring including lines, leaders, & flies
4. Flyfishbonehead preferred lodges & resorts
5. Flyfishbonehead preferred guides
6 Our fly fishing calendars

Click the SPECIES & TACTICS tab for what species are available at a given location 

Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too

The WHAT TO BRING tab has everything you need to know about what gear to bring fly fishing, no matter where you are going.
The other cool feature is the presorted fly tying videos button...


Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too


When you click on these buttons, you will be taken to the Flyfishbonehead library of HD fly tying videos but they will be presorted by species and destination when applicable.

Now finding the fly fishing information you need is easier than ever.


http://www.flyfishbonehead.com/saltwater-fly-tying-videos-flyfishbonehead-fly-tying-library/


Contact us with any questions you might have at:

If you would like to get your guide service or resort on the Flyfishbonehead World Map of Fly Fishing, please contact the flyboss:


http://www.flyfishbonehead.com/saltwater-fly-tying-videos-flyfishbonehead-fly-tying-library/
hunt for fish, not information!!


Continue reading...

Planning a fly fishing trip? Use the Flyfishbonehead World Map of Fly Fishing to help plan. All the information you need including gear, flies, fishing calendars and more.

11/24/13 

the WORLD MAP of FLY FISHING 
by
Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too

We have been receiving many emails about how to use the map recently.  Based on these emails, it was clear that there is some confusion about the various features of the map.  Flyboss & the rest of the crew at Flyfishbonehead thought that a blog tutorial was necessary.


Select destination & using the zoom feature
Go to Flyfishbonehead, select the world map of fly fishing and select your destination.


Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too


The Magnifying glasses on the map allow the user to zoom into regions like central america, south american, the south Pacific or the Caribbean.

Click on the magnifying glass to enlarge or zoom in to an area....

Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too


  Flyfishbonehead World Map of Fly Fishing - Zoom View
From Either the zoom view or the regular view, you can click on the destination of your choice....

Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too


The link leads to the Destination Information tab which is the first tab of all destinations on the Flyfishbonehead World Map of Fly Fishing.
This tab provides basic destination information for a given locale and is sometimes basic & sometimes very detailed.


Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too


By clicking on the tabs, the information for that specific destination will be shown.
Each tab contains specific information:
1. Destination Information
2. Species available and Tactics used
3. What gear to bring including lines, leaders, & flies
4. Flyfishbonehead preferred lodges & resorts
5. Flyfishbonehead preferred guides
6 Our fly fishing calendars

Click the SPECIES & TACTICS tab for what species are available at a given location 

Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too

The WHAT TO BRING tab has everything you need to know about what gear to bring fly fishing, no matter where you are going.
The other cool feature is the presorted fly tying videos button...


Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too


When you click on these buttons, you will be taken to the Flyfishbonehead library of HD fly tying videos but they will be presorted by species and destination when applicable.

Now finding the fly fishing information you need is easier than ever.


http://www.flyfishbonehead.com/saltwater-fly-tying-videos-flyfishbonehead-fly-tying-library/


Contact us with any questions you might have at:

If you would like to get your guide service or resort on the Flyfishbonehead World Map of Fly Fishing, please contact the flyboss:


http://www.flyfishbonehead.com/saltwater-fly-tying-videos-flyfishbonehead-fly-tying-library/
hunt for fish, not information!!


Continue reading...

11/10/13 

2 for 1 offer from now until Christmas!!

Why?  We love our customers & we want you to share the love


From now until December 25, 2013 at midnight Flyfishbonehead is offering 2 for 1 memberships to help make your Christmas shopping a little bit easier.

It's really simple...
Sign up as an enthusiast member for only $15 for the whole year, include your friends name and email address in the comments section.  
We will create an enthusiast account for him or her.  It's that easy! 

Two memberships for the price of one.
(thats only 60 cents per month per person....really!)

 Flyfishbonehead 2 for 1 deal....I ain't no fool, sign me up!!!!

Don't forget, you do not have to be a paying member to read TAIL FLY FISHING MAGAZINE.
It's always free and always will be.

Check out the November 2013 issue:
 Tail Fly Fishing Magazine the free digital publication of Flyfishbonehead


We've added some new flies to the Library of FLY TYING VIDEOS also:

 Fly Tying Videos by Flyfishbonehead & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine




Continue reading...

Life Like Flies - Consider the Ostrich - Tail Fly Fishing Magazine by Flyfishbonehead

11/02/13 

TAIL FLY FISHING MAGAZINE - NOVEMBER 2013

LIFE LIKE FLIES
CONSIDER THE OSTRICH
(another fine article by John Melfi)



Lifelike Flies Flyfishbonehead & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine



When I was about five I spent a startling amount of time dropping bait, scraggly flies, lures, even bare hooks off the end of a dock set in a beautiful blue lake. My hope was to catch some of the visible bluegills and rock bass. 

I used worms, grasshoppers, whatever natural critters I could catch - those never failed. 

Lures, flies, and bare hooks sometimes worked. Flies worked best, but they were inconsistent. Often the fish - and these were small guys, like 4-5 inchers - would nose up to the item and then just turn away. If there was no scent to the lure, these little opportunistic fish were pretty much uninterested. Unless the fly/lure had built-in motion.

After a few years of observation, I started trying to create a fly that would really interest these fish even when the fly itself was not moving. Lures and stiff, plastic "flies" didn't have that inherent liveliness, so they were out. The materials built into the fly had to move on their own; that was the key to effectiveness.  


Granted, these were tiny little panfish; what can they possibly teach us about fishing for big desirables? Plenty, as it turns out. 



Tail Fly Fishing Magazine



Tail Fly Fishing Magazine


Help us support conservation causes like the Bonefish & Tarpon Trust, 1% for the Planet, & the Del Brown Permit Tournament 

Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - fly tying videos & Tail fly fishing magazine


Continue reading...

Latest issue of Tail Fly Fishing Magazine is Awesome!!!!! Tail Fly Fishing Magazine is the free digital publication of Flyfishbonehead. Flyfishbonehead is fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we

10/28/13 

Tail Fly Fishing Magazine - Issue 8 November/December 2013

Tail Fly Fishing Magazine & Flyfishbonehead -we are fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too


The Latest issue of Tail is available for free online at FLYFISHBONEHEAD.
This edition features a one on one interview with New Zealand waterman and fly fishing guide JP Samuelson with amazing scenic & fishing photos from all New Zealand's beautiful coastlines.


Tail Fly Fishing Magazine & Flyfishbonehead, we are fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too

Get some PERSPECTIVE on spooky bonefish and circumstances beyond your control with John Melfi


Tail Fly Fishing Magazine & Flyfishbonehead, we are fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too


We found Milkfish in Costa Rica.  Many have known that they were there, we offer our full account & report in the LOOKDOWN MASSACRE


Tail Fly Fishing Magazine & Flyfishbonehead, we are fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too
Tail Fly Fishing Magazine & Flyfishbonehead, we are fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too



Our fly tying video is a special olive barred deceiver pattern which is perfect for the south bound migrating striped bass in New Jersey and the Chesapeake Bay area.  You can learn to tie it for free in the magazine.  In case you don't know, there is a free fly tying video in every magazine and the back issue are on the website for free!!!



Tail Fly Fishing Magazine & Flyfishbonehead, we are fly fishing in saltwater - introducing a world of travel and fishing to fly anglers worldwide - we make fly tying videos too



READ IT!  IT'S FREE!




Continue reading...

09/29/13 

HEY JOE!!

WHERE YOU GOING WITH THAT GUN IN YOUR HAND?

PISTOL SHRIMP

Interesting species we thought you might like to read about....Loudest Ocean Dweller?

A tiny shrimp known as the Snapping Shrimp or Pistol Shrimp, is on one of the loudest creatures in the World.

This tiny shrimp species (Alpheus heterochaelis) belonging to the Alpheidae family grows to only 1-2 inches (3-5 cms) long, but don't let its size fool you. 

The critter is capable of producing a sound louder than a plane.

These crustaceans are often a olive-green color. They prowl the shallow waters of tropical seas and in the Mediterranean. 
They can be easily identified as it has a normal claw and one noticeably larger snapper claw. 
Its disproportionately large claw can be up to half its body size which makes it look like it's wearing an boxing glove.

The shrimp can be left-handed or right-handed and may feature the special claw on either arm of the body, but unlike regular shrimp claws and other crustaceans, it does not have pincers at the end of it. Instead the claw is designed rather like a pistol with two parts: a hammer, that moves backward into a right-angled position, and the other half of the claw is in a fixed closed position. 
When it releases the hammer part of the claw it snaps perfectly into position and makes its tooth-shaped plunger move into a niche in the other half of the claw.


It was once believed that the sound was generated when the two claw surfaces hit each other. But this isn't the case. 
There are principles of physics in play here:
The snapping action of the claw actually shoots out a jet of water at up to 62 miles an hour (100km/hr) which generates a low pressure cavitation bubble that bursts with a loud snap. 
This phenomenon can be explained by Bernoulli's principle, which states that for an inviscid flow (flow of an ideal fluid with no viscosity), an increase in the speed of the fluid occurs simultaneously with a decrease in pressure or a decrease in the fluid's potential energy. In simpler terms, when a liquid moves above a certain speed, the pressure within the liquid decreases. When this pressure drops, it allows tiny air bubbles in these fast-moving fluids to expand and if the pressure builds back up, the bubbles implode.

The snap of the bubbles also produces something known as sonoluminescence, which is caused when the collapsing cavitation bubble reaches temperatures of over 4700 degrees Celsius or 5000 Kelvin. 
That is almost as hot as the surface of the sun, estimated at around 5,800 Kelvin (5,500 °C)! The sonoluminescence also produces a short, intense flash of light, lasting no longer than 10 nanoseconds and which can't be seen by the naked eye.

The whole process from the snapping of the claw to the burst of the bubble and the loud sound is almost instantaneous and takes place within 300 microseconds. 
Researchers were only able to study this fascinating creature's abilities through ultra high-speed cameras shooting at 40,000 frames per second.
The shrimp uses this unique talent for hunting prey, hence the name "pistol" shrimp. While hunting, the little shrimp hides behind an obscured spot like a burrow and shoots its flashy bubbles at passing prey. 
The pressure of the snapping bubble is sufficient to stun a passing crab or even kill small fish. 
It then pulls the stunned catch into it's burrow and eats.


The snapping shrimp has proven to be competition for larger animals like the Sperm Whale (230+ decibels) and Beluga Whale for the title of loudest animal in the sea. 
The snap of its claw releases a sound that can reach 218 decibels- louder than a gunshot. 

Other interested SNAPPING Facts:

  • Colonies of snapping shrimp consist of a single large female, the queen, and sometimes a single male.  Offspring are divided into nurses who care for the young and soldiers who protect the colony with their huge claws. The soldiers are males the nurses are women, identical to ant colonies.
  • Aquarium hobbyists don't keep pistol shrimps in aquariums as the sonic blast easily cracks the aquarium glass
  • Naval Submarines have been known to hide amongst beds of Pistol shrimp to hide from sonar detection. Apparently the noise they create is so much that other submarines find it impossible to pickup other noise using sonar.
  • Pistol shrimp have have the ability to reverse claws. When the snapping claw is lost, the missing limb will regenerate into a smaller claw and the original smaller appendage will grow into a new snapping claw.
  • The Pistol Shrimp often shares a symbiosis with the goby.  The goby is a small fish that has good eye-sight.  Gobies warn shrimp of any approaching predators, in the exchange of food that it provides to the goby and the burrow that it digs for both, itself and the goby, to live in.


Continue reading...

09/19/13 

EQUILIBRIOCEPTION

(Seasickness)

From Tail Fly Fishing Magazine:


Equilibrioception (Seasickness)

How to avoid seasickness to become a better man....uh, fisherman, that is.


The sad truth is that seasickness prevents many anglers from getting on the water.   Most people do nothing about it since they merely accept it as normal, but there are things you can do about it.  Nearly all people experience motion sickness if given a strong enough motion stimuli. In typical conditions, such as on cruise ships, the prevalence ranges from 3-60%, depending on what you happen to be reading.  It happens to many of us but here are a few things you can do to help prevent or minimize your symptoms.
  1. EAT: 
Eat a large/filling meal before you head to the boat. In most cases, a person with an empty stomach will experience more nausea and sickness than a person who eats about an hour before leaving the dock. Ideally, one should fill up on carbohydrates and avoid greasy and acidic foods. 
  1. DRINK: 
Not alcohol though.  Ideally, one should avoid alcohol or other diuretics the night before since dehydration can exacerbate symptoms. Sip on a bottle of water while on the boat.  This will also help you feel full.

MEDICATION
When eating & drinking won't cut it, try medication.  There are plenty of over-the-counter medications that will help a person cope with the boat ride. Dramamine is the most popular medication and comes in pills and patches. When taking pills, one must remember to start taking it the night before. When doing this, medicine will work before you get symptoms and should prevent issues even in rough seas

Read the rest of this article for free at:






Continue reading...

09/17/13 

RED TIDE REPORT: FLORIDA



Present Status; Southwest Coast:  Karenia brevis, the Florida red tide organism, was detected in background concentrations in one sample collected alongshore of Pinellas County. Other samples collected in southwest Florida this week did not contain K. brevis.  

Present Status; Northwest Coast: Karenia brevis, the Florida red tide organism, was not detected in water samples collected this week offshore of Hernando County.

Present Status; East Coast: Karenia brevis, the Florida red tide organism, was not detected in water samples collected this week in the Indian River Lagoon system (Volusia and Brevard counties) or in and alongshore of Dade County.

Patchy blooms of Pryodinium bahamense, Takayama tasmanica, Thalassiosira sp. and brown tide (Aureoumbra lagunensis) continue in the Indian River Lagoon system (Indian River Lagoon, Mosquito Lagoon, Banana River). These blooms have resulted in discolored water and fish kills in some locations.


Tables and maps of sample results are available at the Florida fish & wildlife conservation commission site
FWC logo



Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission









The website also provides links to additional information related to the topic of Florida red tide including satellite imagery, experimental red tide forecasts, shellfish harvesting areas, the FWC Fish Kill Hotline, the Florida Poison Information C enter to report human health effects related to exposure to red tide, and other wildlife related hotlines: 






Continue reading...

09/11/13 


In remembrance of 9/11/2001, a day that changed the world.


Tail Fly Fishing Magazine and Flyfishbonehead will always remember the fallen.
We would like to recognize & honor emergency medical services like police, fireman & paramedics who risk their lives on a daily basis for our safety & protection.

We also remember the soldiers who protect our country both home and abroad.

You are appreciated and you are important.

We are donating all proceeds from Flyfishbonehead memberships today to emergency medical services and Veterans funds.  Please join and show your support.



Thank you.

Continue reading...

09/03/13 

Thanks Friends!
This posted today on the 1% for the planet blog:








Continue reading...

09/01/13 



Bonefish & Tarpon are catch & release only in Florida


The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) approved these proactive management measures at the June 12, 2013 meeting in Lakeland. The catch-and-release proposal was adopted in recognition of the fact that the economic value of bonefish and tarpon far exceed their value as food fishes.

The following changes become effective Sept. 1, 2013 in all Florida State and Federal waters:

  • All harvest of tarpon will be eliminated, with the exception of the harvest or possession of a single tarpon when in pursuit of an International Game Fish Association record and in conjunction with a tarpon tag.
  • Tarpon tags will be limited to one per person, per year except for properly licensed charter boat captains and fishing guides.
  • Transport or shipment of tarpon becomes limited to one fish per person.
  • There will be a one-fish-per-vessel limit for tarpon.
  • Gear used for tarpon will be limited to hook-and-line only.
  • Multiple hooks in conjunction with live or dead natural bait cannot be used to target or harvest tarpon, or to target bonefish.
  • People will be allowed to temporarily possess a tarpon for photography, measurement of length and girth and scientific sampling, with the stipulation that tarpon more than 40 inches must remain in the water.
  • Tarpon regulations will extend into federal waters.
  • The bonefish tournament exemption permit is eliminated. This exemption allowed tournament anglers with the proper permit to temporarily possess bonefish for transport to a tournament scale.
Read about Bonefish & Tarpon at Flyfishbonehead.com the intuitive website for fly fishing in saltwater


posted by Flyboss



Continue reading...

08/30/13 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TAIL FLY FISHING MAGAZINE!!!


New Issue of Tail
Our First Year Anniversary Issue is available now at:
http://www.flyfishbonehead.com/tail-flyfishing-free-online-magazine/
It's FREE.....just sign in and read.



HOW TO TRANSLATE TAIL FLY FISHING MAGAZINE

This is in response to some recent emails about how to get the translated version:
Use the translate option in the options menu:


step 1. Choose the translate option



step 2. Select page & language to translate


step 3. Click the translate button and start reading


Questions???   email: info@flyfishbonehead.com 

Continue reading...

Going Fishing? Boat Bag Essentials (you can take it with you)

08/24/13 

Boat Bag Essentials  

You Can Take it With You 

John C Melfi

When you're out on a skiff your boat bag is your magicians' kit, your source of angling sustenance, your lifeline when things go awry on deck. 
For a while you can get by with all kinds of stuff hanging from a lanyard around your neck, pockets bulging with a couple boxes that hold a limited selection of flies. 
But unless you're dialed in to the area you're fishing - and like really dialed in - you're going to need more. 
Here's the breakdown of what goes in my bag.


First off, you're wearing polarized sunglasses, right? Great. Do not fish without them. Stow an extra pair in your bag. That way when you drop your original pair into the ocean, or a hinge breaks, or a nose pad comes loose, you've got a backup.

Next up: pliers. These can be hardware-store needle-nose jobs, or fancy aircraft aluminum deals. Either way, they need to have side-cutters for cutting heavy mono and wire. 


Throw an extra cap in your bag. 
Caps are even easier to lose than sunglasses; just a bit of wind or boat speed can deep-six the one you're wearing. A backup is easy to pack and invaluable if you do lose yours. I've fished with guides who've lost their caps to the wind. Capless, their fish-spotting abilities suffered greatly. 



Tuck an extra reel - not just a spare spool - in your bag....READ MORE

Read the rest of the article for free at Flyfishbonehead.com 

in the September/October edition 

of Tail Fly Fishing Magazine   

(Available September 1st but click link for a sneak preview)





Email John C Melfi @ John.melfi@flyfishbonehead.com
Reference - Boat bag 

Continue reading...

Fly Fishing in Costa Rica....Machaca or Roosterfish?

08/18/13 

We were in Quepos, Costa Rica and planning on fishing for more marlin and
sailfish in the electric blue waters of the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. It
was our fifth visit, living & loving the pura vida.


A suggestion was made to consider a day of freshwater fishing for machaca.
Isn't machaca a side dish someone asked?
We laughed, but it really didn't translate that well. We were presented the opportunity to fish with a former Colorado guide (who isn't a former Colorado guide) who created a business of fly fishing the local rapids from a modified drift boat. Sounds unconventional, dangerous and obscure.....how could we say no? We unequivocally fish saltwater for large predatory fish on the flats and blue water, well most of the time anyway. In the past, exceptions have been made for rainbow peacock bass, salmon, and muske only.  There was just something unexplainably appealing about traveling down class II and class III rapids while casting a 4 weight.

Transport picked us up at our lodge at the very comfortable hour of 8 AM. We were brought to a little bakery in Quepos for a fresh breakfast, coffee and a description of what to except.
"The river is teeming with machaca", he said.  Machaca is the very aggressive fresh water species known for their vicious hits and strong fight. They are related to the piranha and have very prominent teeth however they exist on a primary vegetarian diet. The locals refer to machaca as "mini tarpon" as they are acrobatic once hooked completing several leaps before landing.

Our guide had a smug confidence about him stating that "this is one of the worlds best unknown fisheries in the world....you'll see".After a coffee refill, we bought lots of snacks like handmade candy, a few pieces of fresh baked goodness in a take away bag and up the mountain we went.  The chosen path was south on highway 34 from Quepos to the Rio Savegre. It was about a 30 minute drive on the
main road, a quick stop to pick up the transport team then a 35 minute off road trek of spine crunching pot holes and nothing but dirt & bush. It seemed as if we were the only people to venture that far in the jungle but that was only because the plant life is so proliferative there. I was pretty sure that we just
experienced what riding a runaway camel was like, our gear bags and fly boxes in the back of the truck were proof of this. Not one thing was where it was supposed to be and there was possibly a
few items missing.......

Read the rest of the article at:
http://www.flyfishbonehead.com/tail-flyfishing-magazine/issue-6/#?page=26


Continue reading...

Destination Belize

08/05/13 

Permit on the brain? Belize is the solution and Permit is the prize. 


Geography:
Belize is located on the north eastern coast of Central America just south of the Mexican Yucatan Peninsula  is bordered to the north by Mexico, south and west by Guatemala, and to the east by the Caribbean Sea.

What to Expect:
The pristine flats have an abundance of Pemit, from small schools to lone or small groups of 3-4 larger species. The average permit in Belize has been estimated from 12-18 pounds but most commonly 6-15 pounds.

There are big permit there and on you will get anywhere from 2-6 quality chances to throw your fly at a permit with a better than average chance at actually catching one.
Landing a Permit:
Your best chance, of course is encountering a small school of small to mid-sized fish. These fish are more aggressive in a school as there is competition for food.

You will see tailing fish, they for some reason do quite a bit of tailing in Belize while the ones we see in Florida only rarely tail. Other Local Species:
  • Bonefish
  • Tarpon
  • Snook are everywhere in Belize
  • Barracuda
  • Shark
  • Wahoo
  • Marlin
  • Sailfish
  • Dorado (Mahi-mahi)
  • And many other species are within reach in Belize. There is great inshore and offshore fishing including big Barracuda and Spanish Mackerel.

An Official, FlyFishBoneHead tip for selecting a destination - When booking your fishing trip, be sure to consider destinations that are suited to both fly fishing and non fly fishing guests.

Here is a list of resorts and fly fishing lodges we recommend that offer enough amenities to interest both the fly fishing and non fly fishing members of your group or family.
  1. Ambergris
  2. Remote Islands
  3. Mainland Coast
  4. El Pescador
  5. Turneffe Flats Lodge*
  6. The Inn at Robert's Grove
  7. Journeys End
  8. Blackbird Caye *
  9. Machaca Hill Lodge
  10. Portofino*
  11. Coco Plum Resort*
  12. Jaguar Reef

*these lodges and resorts have good on your own, unguided, flats, fly fishing available in addition to the guided fishing.

Continue reading...

How To Catch A Bonefish

08/02/13 

There are many tips and techniques that will help any angler increase their chances of catching a bone... Here are 3 very important steps we suggest you take.

Step 1: Contact your Guide
Believe it or not, your guide is an important piece of the puzzle and should be someone that you communicate with prior to packing for the big fishing trip. Listen to your guide. (Contact us if you don't have a Guide and we'll do our best to match you up with one).
Step 2: Bringing the Appropriate Gear 
Ask your guide what leader length and strength is appropriate, and get a handle on what flies he prefers. If you can't contact him before your trip, bring an 8-weight floating line; for sure take a 9-weight if you're just fishing the Keys, or a 6- or 7-weight for the Yucatan and Belize.

Your line has to be a tropical one; bonefish-specific tapers are best. Leaders should be about 10 feet, tapering from a heavy butt of about .025 inches to 10-15 pound test, again depending on where you're going. Recommending specific flies for an unknown locale is a fool's errand, but we're not afraid of such tasks, so here goes: We would never be without some spawning shrimp patterns; crabs; and Clouser Deep Minnows tied in Gotcha colors (pink thread, white underwing, pearl Krystal Flash or Polar Flash in the middle, a tan overwing, and lead eyes). Each of these flies should be tied in a variety of weights; sink rate is generally more critical than actual pattern. Keep in mind that bonefish flats seem always to be windy. You have to do your quick, accurate and long casting in the wind if you're going to be consistently successful.
Step 3: The Catch

  • Finding the fish & spotting the fish
  • Quickly cast your fly - At times, getting your fly into a 10' circle will work, if you take the 'quickly' part seriously
  • Strip Set - These are strong fish with hard mouths. Raising your rod to set the hook doesn't usually work - Strip, every time.

Bonefish are strong and they've got hard mouths.  Raising your rod to set the hook doesn't work - you have to strip set, every time.  Simple as that.
A few additional pointers: 
(For everything you need to know about Bonefish visit: http://www.flyfishbonehead.com/flyfishbonehead-bonefish/)
*Remember that you have to do your quick, accurate and long casting in the wind if you're going to be consistently successful. So we suggest:

  • Get a good casting book or video; or better yet
  • Hire an instructor
  • Always practice before you go

Continue reading...

Hunt Giant Trevally (GT) on the Fly

07/24/13 

What's the next fish species you're hunting? If you're up a challenge, we highly recommend the Giant Trevally. This fish of many names is quickly becoming a premier target for fly fishing fanatics every where to pursue.

Here's what an angler should know before embarking on a trip to land a GT...

An incredibly strong, ferocious and aggressive reef fish. It is a large member of the jack family and is also known as the Giant Kingfish, Pacific Jack Fish, Goyan Fish, Lowly Trevally, Barrier Trevally, Ulua in Hawaii, Mamulan in the Marianas, Rōnin-aji in Japan and just plain GT for short. The Giant Trevally is similar in shape and appearance to a number of other large jacks and trevallies, having a large profile secondary to its muscular compressed oval body. GT's are normally a silvery color with occasional dark spots although males may be black once they mature. The fish grows relatively fast, reaching sexual maturity with a length of approximately 60 cm at three years of age. With a documented maximum length of greater than 5.5 feet (~2 meters) and a weight of 175 lbs. (80kg), fish this big (or even close to this size) are extremely rare, with the species only occasionally seen at lengths greater than 3 feet (~0.8 meters). The Hawaiian Islands seem to have the largest fish, so if you are aiming for a trophy....Aloha, GTs over 100 lbs. (45 kg) are there.

Keep in Mind: Only three GTs over 100 lbs. (45 kg) from non-Hawaiian destinations have been reported to the IGFA.
GT's Geography: The Giant Trevally is distributed throughout the tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific. They range southward from South America in the west to Hawaii in the east, as far north as Japan and southern Australia. They range along the coasts of three continents and many hundreds of smaller islands and archipelagos in the Indian Ocean.
GT's Location Preference: GT's inhabit a wide range of ocean environments as well as some non-marine environments. They usually start as juveniles in the safety of estuaries, shallow bays and lagoons, as most species do. These juveniles are also well known to live in waters of very low salinity such as coastal lakes and upper reaches of rivers. They tend to prefer brackish waters similar to baby Tarpon and Jack Crevalles. GT's move to deeper reefs, offshore atolls, large embayment's, bombora or drop-off channels as they become adults and realize their speed and power.
How to Hunt the Flats King:

Keep in Mind: You have a GT on the line? Prepare yourself, it's time for battle against the ferocious beast. They know their domain, are incredibly strong and they will do anything to get off your line, except jump.
Most of the time, you will be chasing solitary GT's on the flats. They are not difficult to locate since they aren't quiet as they are pushing a lot of water. Solitary hunters have an advantage over pack hunters when you throw a fly at them because they are the only hunter there to attack. They will aggressively assault your fly and you will know that there is a GT at the end of your line. Some larger and bolder GT have been seen eating a lobster head first while it's in a defensive stance. So you can image what they would do to a fleeing fly. The name of the game is creating the illusion of distress. If you cast a fly into the range of a GT, strip it effectively making lots of noise thus creating the impression that it is a desperate bait fish fleeing for its life, you will probably be successful. They are there to eat and you should be able to entice one to attack. That being said, they aren't injudicious so it might take some convincing for them to come on to the flat which is why many anglers will just chum for them..
Once hooked it is absolutely essential to high stick (Click HERE to read about how to "High Stick" to get your GT on board) as you have just infuriated one tough fish. The run of a GT is not like the run of a bonefish. They go in a zigzag motion and frequently turn around to come straight toward you which is pretty much the opposite of the blistering straight line sprint of the bonefish.
GT is no doubt the strongest flats fish on the planet. If you get to fish for and land it, reminisce and treasure the experience.

Keep in mind: It's a difficult species on many levels.
Flies to Use:

  • Baitfish imitators, but our friends in Australia really like poppers. Depending on size of fish you can tie them on hooks from a 1-0 to a 5-0.
  • Most Big Poppers (Yellow/green Blue/White & Pink/White)
  • Trey Comb's Sea Habit (for almost any big salt water fish)
  • Enrico Puglisi's Peanut Butter (Black/White, gray/White)
  • Any Glass Minnow
Search our HD Video Fly Tying Library for specific flies and fly tying videos.

Continue reading...

Hunting Bonefish & Permit on the Flats with FlyFishBoneHead

07/23/13 

FlyFishBoneHead set up a trip last week for one of our VIP Members to hunt for the giant bonefish of Biscayne Bay. This is Paul's story...

 
"I recently spent 2 days fly fishing on the flats of Biscayne Bay.
Day 1 was a bit of disappointment due to high winds and bad visibility.
I saw 3 large unresponsive bones that decided they did not want to eat anything.
I did end up spotting 3 decent sized Tarpon up close, but with the low visibility, I had no time to react to present the fly.
The day concluded  and we had not seen a permit..... It was a long day.

Day 2 looked as if a big tropical wave was approaching that could have put a stop to the fun.
We decided to give it a go despite the forecast. The morning tide was prefect for Permit.
We strategically made our way over to try a spot that's well-known for producing fish but I didn't land a Permit here - However, the location proved to be a successful spot as I landed a 10lb Jack Caravel.
Spirits lifted; we were already off to a much better start than the day before.

As the day continued visibility improved with the high sun - However, off in the distance lurked enormous thunder clouds & boomers. With the impending weather changes we went back to where we saw the Tarpon the day before.
We were able to see a long way, but there were no Tarpon to speak of.
As bad luck would have it we observed 3 Permit on the same site and were not ready...another opportunity blown.

As forecasted, the weather rolled in.
We ran south to the beginning of Key Largo and were able to skirt the tropical down pour.
After waiting for about an hour and a half the looming weather and lightning cleared enough for us to run north and return to Featherbed flat where we saw Bonefish the day before.

It didn't take long to see very active Bones feeding off the back of a Ray.
Fortune returned. I smiled, casted and I might have held my breath momentarily as I launched my first cast into the feed. Instantly, I came tight to a nice 8lb Bone.
Quite a different fish than I played with in Bimini in back in April.
Yes, things were starting to look up now.
We made a quick move to the north side of the flat and found a nice pod of aggressively feeding and tailing Bones.
Again, I placed the fly on the nose of a beast. This one fought differently than the first for sure. After 4 blistering runs and 15 minutes later, I had a 10lb Bone boat side and in my hand.
We tried for about another hour with a very low tide and unable to reach into the skinny parts of the flat.
We pulled the plug after that.

I will be back in October to do it again. Also, I am planning a trip in the spring for Tarpon." - Paul B, 
FlyFishBoneHead VIP since 2013.

Click HERE for more information & membership types

Continue reading...

Day 3: Permit On the Fly - At the 2013 Del Brown Permit Tournament

07/18/13 

Day 3 greeted anglers with very heavy rain. There were several storm fronts moving about from the Marquesas all the way to Cujoe Key.

Before the boats departed three of the participants decided not to fish because of the weather. Thinking about yesterday's Permit that nearly made it onto the boat pushed our team and gave us hope. Accepting the wet weather and constant down pours, the team decided to trek east in rain gear, still anticipating to catch tailing permit and bonefish visible on the flats.

After being wet, cold and nearly blown off the boat all day the sun finally joyously broke through at approximately 4:PM EST, a mere 30 minutes before the tournament was set to end. The time flew by to greet the rapidly approaching deadline and we did not have any chances in that brief time to catch a fish. 

After fishing soaking in rain for nine hours our efforts produced no Permit.

The tournament concluded with only two participants catching Permit and only three participants catching Bonefish. The weather was unyielding and very unfriendly for Permit fishing or any fishing.
FlyFishBoneHead finished tied for third with six other contestants.

In the end, only 2 anglers managed to land a permit during the tournament. It was a great time with a great bunch of guys regardless of the poor fishing conditions and we hope to be back in 2014.

Visit & Like Us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/flyfishbonehead

Continue reading...

Permit On the Fly - At the 2013 Del Brown Permit Tournament

07/16/13 

Day 2 at the Del Brown Permit Tournament located in the Florida Keys. Now in its 13th year, this event has started out with all rain, 15 boats and is limited to 1 angler per boat.

The background on Del:
The late Del Brown is currently the only angler in history to have caught more than 500 permit on his fly rod.

Tournament Details:
The Del Brown Permit Tournament is dedicated to the sport of fly fishing for Permit which Brown helped make famous here in the Florida Keys. Brown tied a fly called the "Merkin" that was a close enough representation of a crab that permit rushed to eat it.

Tournament, 2nd Day:
Boats departed this morning into high winds and very heavy rain at 7:30AM EST. Our guide (for FlyFishBoneHead & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine) is Nate Wheeler. Started strategically tied up on a mangrove island in-order to hide from the massive approaching storm where I caught a Redfish.

Hope blossomed early in the day when the rain stopped and we were able to motor East. In this new location I had a shot at a 30lb Permit and our spirits soared... Through the fly directly infront of him, but he didn't eat.

Eventually, we found ourselves in the middle an enormous flat with about 50 small tailing permit.  The fish became spooked each time the boat got within 70 feet. With the clock ticking, "lines out" time and the sun deciding to call it an early day, I got out and waded into chest deep water until I was 25-30 feet away. Threw a few bad casts and a few good ones, had one chase and no hook up.
The winds kicked up, churning wildly around and before I had a chance to take advantage of this new location the Permit left the flat. Wind blowing at 20-25, no longer able to hold the boat anywhere and we drifted a bank.
Fortunately, there were 2 more bad shots at Permit due to bad angles into the wind. That's when 12 gigantic Tarpon rolled by. One of the 12, an 80lb Tarpon whipped around and chased my fly. He chased it until the fly was caught in a piece of grass and then the tarpon lost interest.

 
The tables turned when Nate announced, "Here comes a push at 12 o'clock, about 50 feet out and coming right at us!" I instantly threw right on it, they shifted left. I adapted quickly, picked up and threw left, hooked up on a small Permit and got him within 15 feet of the boat before he got off.

Summary of Day 2:
- 2 boats caught Permit today 
- 11 did not

To be continued, more tomorrow...

Continue reading...

Bonefish Fever

07/13/13 

The Description:
Bonefish are silver in color with green/black vertical stripes almost clear fins. The bases of the pectoral fins are yellowish while the tip of the nose has a black spot or in certain Bahama destinations a blue nose. They primarily form schools until they are large solitary hunters. Some of the larger individuals travel solo, in pairs or in schools more rarely. The bonefish, has many names the "flats phantom" or "gray ghost", and is pound for pound one of the strongest and fastest salt-water fish. Bonefishing is a shallow-water pursuit done in depths ranging from 8 inches to several feet of water. Flyfishbonehead has seen big bonefish beach themselves chasing food. They move too fast for their own good sometimes. Bonefish may follow stingrays, much like the Giant Trevally will follow seals & sharks to ambush small prey flushed out & disturbed by the rays.

The Hunt:
Bonefish are best pursued with light tackle & their prey is generally small shrimp, crabs, worms, small baitfish, which means that heavy-caliber tackle is not only unnecessary but actually counterproductive.

Fishing for bonefish can be the model of simplicity; a box of flies and a spool of tippet, some clippers if you need to change flies, a pair of good polarized sunglasses and a hat are all that's necessary in many bonefishing locales.

How-To Tips from the Pro's...

  • Listen to your guide. It's often been said that the very best bonefish guides are in South Florida and the Florida Keys, and to some extent that's - there are outstanding guides in those areas. That's the place where bonefishing as we know it was born. But there are fantastic guides in all the great bonefish locales, and we'll do our best to match you up with them. Keep in mind, too, that a guide who knows a set of flats as well as he does his own living room won't necessarily be the best guide for you; how you interact with and mesh with a guide will have a lot to do with how successful you are.
  • As for flies and tackle, again, listen to your guide. Contact him before you pack your rods, ask what leader length and strength is appropriate, and get a handle on what flies he prefers. If you can't contact him before your trip, bring an 8-weight floating line; for sure take a 9-weight if you're just fishing the Keys, or a 6- or 7-weight for the Yucatan and Belize.


Continue reading...

5 Saltwater Fishing Flies for Hunting Bonefish

07/13/13 

Meet the SIMRAM.

This a newer fly which is a variation of the Gotcha. The flash is moved off of the body and tied over the wing segment to make it more visible and more realistic in the water. It is a fairly easy tie, looks great to fish by imitating shrimp and has been very successful so far.

What's it used for? Bonefish (Click here for more information on hunting Bonefish).

Click here for the fly tying recipe.












Meet the Bahamas' Bonefish Gotcha
This is a shrimp imitation for bonefish which is a favorite in the Bahamas. It is usually tied on a small hook 4 or 6 and has always worked effectively on Bonefish of all sizes.

Click here for the fly tying recipe.















The Redfish Crab
This is another successful crab pattern for Redfish, Permit and Bonefish. There are natural colors with hints of orange throughout the body and the legs are tied like a winf near the eye of the hook. Redfish love it! One of the easier crabs to make since the lega can be added after trimming.

Click here for the fly tying recipe.














Veverka's Mantis Shrimp
Veverka's Mantis shrimp looks nothing like a real mantis shrimp but for some reason, it works. Created for Bonefish, mainly because he didn't have one of his own creations in his fly box. He managed to capture the important part of the mantis, the eyes. Guess that's all it took. This is a very productive pattern.

Click here for the fly tying recipe.













Bonefish Clouser (Craft fur)

What can we say.....This pattern has caught more fish than any other fly pattern ever! This is a baitfish pattern which works very well for bonefish and a bunch of other species.

Click here for the fly tying recipe.

Continue reading...

Bonefish on the fly

06/12/13 

Discuss fly fishing for bonefish

Continue reading...

Florida Flats Fishing

03/23/13 

Lower Keys

Fishing with Capt Nate Wheeler of Waypoint Charters in Summerland was exciting but difficult. We started off the morning throwing to 80-120 lb tarpon rolling in a channel.

Continue reading...

Promotions, Social Media, Boasting, Etc

03/07/13 

PROMOTIONS

Tail Fly Fishing Magazine
Flyfishbonehead & Tail Fly Fishing Magazine on the flats with Florida Flats Fishing guide Bob Branham

Travel Blog

01/06/13 

Greeting from Costa RIca. PURA VIDA!

Fighting a Sailfish
Jorge with a Flyfishbonehead Sailfish on the fly

Continue reading...

News & Records

12/07/12 

By Website Contributor: Martin
http://www.grindtv.com/outdoor/blog/44931/yellowfin+tuna+caught+off+mexico+expected+to+be+largest+ever+landed/

Bonehead in Cabo

11/20/12 

By Website Contributor: Grant Hartman
http://baja-anglers.blogspot.mx/2012/11/joe-ballarini-with-nice-bull-dorado.html

Continue reading...

Instagram